How Do Customers Choose Their Products?

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If you’ve ever been down the cereal aisle of a supermarket, then you’ll know that there’s no shortage of options when it comes to what people eat in the morning, especially if you’ve been to one of those large American supermarkets. It’s the way that the current economic system works: it’s up the consumer to decide which product they want to buy. But what goes into that decision making process? We take a look at some factors below, which, if you incorporate them into your business, might just bring you a few more customers.

A Lifestyle Addition

People are buying a product when they make a purchase, but that’s not the only thing they’re buying. They’re also buying a slice of a lifestyle. A spade is never just a spade when it comes to buying products: everything’s loaded with meaning. They could buy an item because they want to be a part of the culture where it’s currently in style, or because they want to showcase themselves as environmentally friendly. In some cases, they might have just seen the type of people who appeared in the advertisement for the product and wanted to be like them. So remember: your product is more than just a product. It means something.

Look and Feel

In most cases, people aren’t able to try out the products they buy before they make a purchase for the first time. They have to make their decisions based on a whole bunch of criteria other than “what is this item actually like?” The look and feel of the packaging, for instance, is mightily important. You’ll know this yourself if you’ve ever bought a bottle of wine based on the style of the label! When it comes to your item, people will be more likely to consider picking it off the shelf if the packaging is on point. Consumers like high-quality packaging, and things like resealable plastic bags, if they’re buying things that have a limited shelf life once opened. So as well as focusing your attention what’s going on with your product, spend some time making sure that the packaging it comes in is high-quality.

The Cost Factor

There’s not a single consumer out there that doesn’t think about the price. This doesn’t necessarily mean they’re looking for the cheapest option; it works the other way around, too. Someone who wants to show the world they’re doing well won’t buy something that’s cheap, even if it does the same job as the more expensive option. Everything’s about value perception. How you present your item (high-cost, low-cost, or middle of the road) will depend on the demographics of people you’re trying to sell the item too.

Speed and Efficiency

Finally, remember that speed is valuable in this world. If you’re selling your product online, then you’ll lose many a customer if you’re only able to offer a vague delivery period. Saying it’ll be with you in 7-10 days isn’t good enough these days; customers will just go somewhere that delivers more quickly.

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