The Downsides To Working From Home

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Before the pandemic, many people were keen to work from home, and when the big switch came so that all businesses that could operate remotely should, it suited a lot of people nicely. However, it won’t have suited everyone, and even those who always wanted to work from home discovered that the reality of their dream was far from what they had expected. 

The truth is that although there are a great many benefits to working from home for both the employee and employer, there are disadvantages too, and it’s wise to know what they are so you can weigh up the pros and cons and make a decision as to what is best for you going forward. Read on to find out more. 

Lack Of Community 

One of the biggest differences between working in an office and working from home is that you will see and engage with many more people when you have a place of work to go to. Whether it’s your colleagues, your boss, people in stores and on public transport, or just those walking along the street, there is a sense of community. 

When you work remotely, you won’t have this, at least not in quite the same way. It can become lonely and frustrating, not to mention exhausting, when you’re all by yourself. Some people just work better with others; even if they are working on a solo project, they still feel better with other people around them. If this is the only issue you have with remote working, there is an easy fix – you can go to rent office space that allows hot-desking or flexible terms, or head out to a park or café. In other words, you can be around people if that’s what helps you work better. 

Image from Pixabay

Lack Of Motivation 

Another common issue with remote working is a distinct lack of motivation. Motivation is what people need to drive them forward and ensure they reach their goals in the time frame they intended. When motivation is lost, these goals become lost too, and productivity can suffer. 

The reason that motivation can sometimes be lacking when working from home is that there is no supervision, so there is no one to check up on what you are doing. Although some people will be glad of this and can work regardless, others find they need the constant presence of a colleague or manager to help them keep going. Otherwise they can become distracted, something that can happen so easily when you’re at home. 

A Poor Working Environment 

If you always intended to work from home and you’re happy to do so, then you will have created a dedicated office within your property to work from. This might be in a spare bedroom, in a playroom that is no longer needed, in a specially designed shed, or perhaps you’ve converted your attic into a comfortable space to do business from complete with ergonomic furniture. 

However, if working from home came as a surprise, or you think (and hope) it’s only temporary, then you might not have made yourself an office. You might be working from the sofa or your bed, or perhaps from the kitchen table with the rest of the family bustling around you. This is not conducive to a good working environment and good productivity, and if you don’t have the funds or the inclination to create a workspace at home, you’ll never be truly comfortable.

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